About Andrew Newton

A recent graduate of Clark University with a master's degree in British and European history, Andrew Newton has been interested in sports cars, particularly of the classic variety, since a very early age. Aside from vintage sports and racing cars, he is passionate about travel, world history, and writing. Andrew currently works at the Larz Anderson Auto Museum in Brookline, Massachusetts, where he contributed text and interpretation for the "Britain Can Make It" exhibit on postwar British sports cars. After deciding that academia was not the right path for him, Andrew has decided to follow his biggest passion and pursue a career in automotive journalism.

First Batch – 1963 Chevrolet Corvette Z06

California dealer and racer Paul Reinhart had proven his skill behind the wheel of a Corvette ably enough by 1962 to be one of the names on the list of six recipient's for the all new Sting Ray Z06. The Z06 package was distinguished from other 1963 Corvettes by heavy duty suspension, power-assisted brakes with a dual-circuit master cylinder, a 36-gallon fuel tank and finned cast aluminum knock-off wheels. Of course, the cars also had the 360 … [Read more...]

British Muscle – 1976 Aston Martin V8

Aston Martin’s rather simply named model, the V8, was around nearly unchanged for almost twenty years and was the company's only real offering for part of that time. The 1970s and 1980s were not exactly the best of times for Aston Martin. This partly explains why the V8 was on offer for so long, but at least it was a great looking machine with plenty of performance. Powered by the Tadek Marek-designed V-8 that was first found in the original … [Read more...]

Feisty Fiat – 1967 Abarth OTR 1000

The relationship between Fiat and Carlo Abarth was already well established and extremely fruitful by the mid-1960s when the OTR 1000 came into being. Based on the Fiat 850 Coupe, it was fitted with a special "radiale" engine displacing just under a liter, fitted with Weber carburetors, and making 100 horsepower. As usual, racing success was the aim of the new car, and OTR stood for Omologato Turismo Radiale. Unfortunately, the SCCA deemed … [Read more...]

Jim Russell Junior – 1961 Lotus 20/22

Designed to replace the 18, the Lotus 20 was lower, sleeker, shorter, wider and more aerodynamic than its predecessor. It dominated Formula Junior in 1961 with both factory drivers and privateers finding success, and in 1962 it was further improved with the 22, which had a stiffer chassis and Girling disc brakes up front. 1962 saw even more victories with Peter Arundell taking 18 victories in 25 starts. … [Read more...]

Retired Racer – 1964 MGB Project

MG built over 510,000 examples of the MGB Roadster and GT, making it the top selling British sports car ever. It was cheap, fun and easy on the eyes. It was the Miata of the '60s. The B was a popular choice for the track, too, and it remains popular to this day. Thanks to the high number of cars to choose from and the relatively high availability of parts, it's a perfect starter car for people just venturing into classic car ownership as well as … [Read more...]

Unconventional, Never Raced – 1968 Shelby Turbine Indy Car

Indianapolis, more than any other race track, has had an interesting relationship with turbine-powered race cars. The 500 was very nearly won by turbines in both 1967 and '68, and for a short time turbines looked like they could be the way of the future at the Brickyard. By 1969, however, the USAC had issued rule changes that effectively rendered them uncompetitive and relegated them to footnote status in the history books. While turbines were … [Read more...]

West Coast Warrior – 1954 Ferrari 375 MM

The 375 MM effectively combined the race-proven chassis from the 340 with the 4.5-liter 340 horsepower V-12 from Ferrari's ill-fated Indianapolis car. Most examples had either spider or berlinetta bodywork by Pinin Farina, and they were used to great success on both sides of the Atlantic, even helping to secure enough points in international competition for Ferrari to win the Manufacturer's Championship in 1953 and 1954. Only around sixteen … [Read more...]

Mini’s Big Brother – 1965 MG 1100 Coupe

BMC's Alec Issigonis-designed AD016 platform was sold over a twelve year period as an Austin, an MG, a Morris, an Innocenti, a Riley, a Vanden Plas and a Wolseley with either 1.2 or 1.3-liter versions of the venerable A-Series motor. Over 3 million of these badge engineered little cars were eventually sold, making it one of the most popular British cars in history. In the domestic market, it was only available at first as a four-door saloon, but … [Read more...]

Itty Bitty Bimmer – 1963 BMW 700 Coupe

We're usually talking about Volkswagens when the subject of small German rear-engined automobiles comes up, but from 1959 to 1965 BMW of all companies had one of their own called the 700. An economical but attractive little thing, it gave BMW a sales boost when their bank account needed it most, with almost 200,000 of them churned out before BMW stopped producing tiny cars once and for all. The replacement for the Isetta-derived 600, the 700 … [Read more...]

Ex-Peter Revson – 1972 McLaren M20 Can-Am

The orange cars from McLaren were the ones to beat in the glory days of Can-Am, as the M8 and its derivatives steamrolled the competition and as its two star drivers, McLaren and Hulme, put on the "Bruce and Denny Show". That kind of dominance in racing never lasts forever, of course,  and in McLaren's case it was Porsche, a late comer to the Can-Am party, that posed the biggest threat yet seen in the series. McLaren stood up to the … [Read more...]